A True Cancer Story

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1     For those who missed the daily tips, blogs etc, sign up for the free e-zine which will have the weeks tips and the blogs. Send an e-mail to fibro@drgenemartin.com, write e-zine in the subject, and you’ll receive the e-zine every Friday. I’ll need your full name. Also make sure your spam filter is not intercepting it.

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My New Year’s Resolution-Being Judgemental

Announcements

1     For those who missed the daily tips, blogs etc, sign up for the free e-zine which will have the weeks tips and the blogs. Send an e-mail to fibro@drgenemartin.com, write e-zine in the subject, and you’ll receive the e-zine every Friday. I’ll need your full name. Also make sure your spam filter is not intercepting it.

2    I’ve created a FREE DVD. It covers various topics to make your lives easier. From how to talk to your doctor to the real scoop on pain management groups to exercise, to social situation etc etc. Please go to www.drgenemartin.com to get yours. One great piece of feedback is people telling me how the chapter on “how to speak to your doctor” about fibro is especially good. In other words, how not to have the doc dismiss you in 5 minutes. I’m really happy these are helping. So far we’ve sent out over 2100. Again it is FREE and meant to be a help to those I can’t help in person. (The the way, the feedback has been great and these are non-profit projects).

My New Year’s Resolution

For the past 25 or so years, I’ve always made the same New Year’s resolution, and unfortunately, I’ve never been able to live up to it. I fail much more often than I succeed. My excuse, I’m human.

What is this resolution? No, I don’t smoke, I don’t drink, I don’t procrastinate, I exercise daily, I’m not overweight etc etc etc. (these are the common ones people always talk about.)

My New Year’s Resolution is always: I will not be judgmental, I will not judge people. You know something; this is possibly the hardest one to keep. We are so conditioned to judge, that we don’t even realize we do it, yet we do it constantly.

Since my practice is limited to Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, every time I receive a call from a prospective patient, certain thoughts run through my head. Will this patient be difficult, will he/she show up, if this person becomes a patient, will they follow instructions and will they constantly complain. I also question myself: Will I be able to help this patient and will I do the best I possibly can. Yes; I even judge myself (in fact we all do).

Interestingly, time after time, I’ve always found my patients to be lovely, warm, certainly compliant and just the nicest people. I always do the best I can and really do care about all my patients, yet I judge myself.

So, why do we all judge.

I’m not sure, I suppose it starts when we’re children, our parents, (though they generally love us), want us to do well in school so we try to live up to their expectations, the teachers judge us, our friends judge; as we get older and work, our employers and co-workers judge us.  Add to this all the advertising and media of the perfect woman with the gorgeous looks, the perfect housewife, raising her 3 children while even working a full time job, the television shows where the characters are handsome, witty and charming ; thus we can’t help but compare ourselves and we start comparing others and making judgments.

Interestingly, the great majority of times, when we judge somebody, without knowing anything about them, we are wrong.

Ever been in an elevator with a person who has an angry look on their face, perhaps you say good morning and get a snappy reply back. We judge, but for all we know, that person might have just received a notice that they are being audited by the I.R.S., or found out that their child received an “F” in algebra, or even that they were given a work project that is due in 3 hours. Perhaps, someone close to them just passed away. We really know so little.

Now, what about the person with Fibromyalgia? Since it is so often invisible, one day a person might feel good enough to smile, the next day, they might look and feel miserable and be in no position to chit-chat. In fact, I would bet that there are many people with Fibromyalgia whom you see daily, yet you have no idea that they are sick.

Add to this, the constant judgments you receive from the many different doctors you see. Sure some are nice and caring, but you’ve all had those Docs who give you 5 minutes of their time and feel that it is a privilege for you to pay them $450.00 for these minutes. How about the Docs who deny that you are sick?  What about those doctors who tell you that the symptoms are in your head. What about the disabled fibro patients who cannot get disability after applying again and again. It’s easy to become judgmental and distrustful (it’s close cousin).

Yet, as I had mentioned, being judgmental is not good nor is it healthy, sure there are some pretty nasty people out there, but I would guess that most people are nice, want to be liked and want to live a healthy and safe life. Being judgmental is a cycle, the more we judge, the more we get in the habit of judging.

I continue to make the same resolution year after year, perhaps over time, I’ve gotten better, but will I ever reach the point of being a non-judgmental person; most probably not, but I’ll keep trying.

I’m only human.

Dr. Gene Martin, D.C.

Fibromyalgia Relief Center of the Bay Area

520 South El Camino Real, Ste 520

San Mateo Ca. 94402

650-558-1010

E-mail: fibro@drgenemartin.com

Web: http://www.drgenemartin.com

Skype: dr.gene.martin

Why isn’t there more Research being done to find a cure for Fibromyalgia?

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1     For those who missed the daily tips, blogs etc, sign up for the free e-zine which will have the weeks tips and the blogs. Send an e-mail to fibro@drgenemartin.com, write e-zine in the subject, and you’ll receive the e-zine every Friday. I’ll need your full name. Also make sure your spam filter is not intercepting it.

2    I’ve created a FREE DVD. It covers various topics to make your lives easier. From how to talk to your doctor to the real scoop on pain management groups to exercise, to social situation etc etc. Please go to www.drgenemartin.com to get yours. One great piece of feedback is people telling me how the chapter on “how to speak to your doctor” about fibro is especially good. In other words, how not to have the doc dismiss you in 5 minutes. I’m really happy these are helping. So far we’ve sent out over 2100. Again it is FREE and meant to be a help to those I can’t help in person. (The the way, the feedback has been great and these are non-profit projects).

Why isn’t there more Research being done to find a cure for Fibromyalgia?

This is an excellent question, which also has many answers, Firstly, there is so much confusion and misunderstanding about Fibromyalgia that many researchers do not know where to begin. Another reason is that Fibromyalgia is not a well known illness among the general public. Ask the average person about Fibromyalgia and they’ll probably either say that they never heard of it, or that it is “that pain disease.” I know this for a fact as I ask this question constantly, not just to the people I meet, but also to many doctors and other health care professionals. One reason for this is that Fibromyalgia is such an isolating illness that many sufferers don’t even speak about it. When they do they are met with blank stares and sometimes even accused of being a malingerer (faking the illness).

Still, another reason for the small amount of research is that research itself is very expensive; costing in the millions and tens of millions. The Government does fund research, but in the times of troubled economics, that research money is drastically reduced. This is the case at the present. Many scientists rely on grants from organizations for their research, but again, with a slow economy, the money is not as plentiful.

Fibromyalgia is not a glamorous illness; the average person cannot see the symptoms as they are so internal. After all, how can you tell if a person is suffering from the “Fibro Fog”? You are more apt to believe that this fibro sufferer is mentally impaired, or perhaps even suffering from dementia. Fibromyalgia pain is a type of pain that cannot be described unless you experience it yourself. (Can a man ever understand how painful childbirth can be?).

Therefore, Fibromyalgia is virtually invisible to the average non fibro patient. Very little visibility means no demand for more research. I’ve heard that anywhere from 2 to 6 percent of the population have Fibromyalgia and I believe this number to be on the low end as so many times, fibro people are not diagnosed properly. You never see walks in the park to find a cure or telethons to raise money for fibro research. For years, women had to scream to get more funding for breast cancer research.

Much of the research money comes from large pharmaceutical companies who do have the resources, scientists and laboratories to do the research, but remember that these companies are also businesses and their goal is to make a profit. There is much more money to be made finding medications to combat high cholesterol or heart disease, than to find a medication for Fibromyalgia. After all, a much larger percentage of the population deals with high cholesterol. I believe that Pfizer must have never in their wildest imagination thought that Lipitor (a cholesterol lowering medication), would become the huge largest selling medication in the history of Pharmacology.

If Fibromyalgia affected a larger percent of the population, you’d see a lot more research being done. If people with fibro opened their mouths more, yelled and made a fuss you’d hear much more about it in the media and the population would be much more familiar with it. Everybody knows and fears colon or pancreatic cancer, but how many people know anything about Fibromyalgia?

One last note, one of the reasons you see so many ads for Lyrica in the media is that Pfizer is about to lose it’s patent on Lipitor which will mean a drop in their income, thus they are pushing their other products in a big way. We’ve all seen the commercials of the woman who is taking Lyrica and appears to be totally fine, normal and living a healthy life. Those of you with Fibromyalgia know that this is just not the case. At best and if you are one of the lucky ones, it lessens the pain a bit, but certainly does not bring yu back to normal health.

Dr. Gene Martin, D.C.

Fibromyalgia Relief Center of the Bay Area

520 South El Camino Real, Ste 520

San Mateo Ca. 94402

650-558-1010

E-mail: fibro@drgenemartin.com

Web: http://www.drgenemartin.com

Skype: dr.gene.martin

Should I Force Myself to Exercise?

Announcements

1     For those who missed the daily tips, blogs etc, sign up for the free e-zine which will have the weeks tips and the blogs. Send an e-mail to fibro@drgenemartin.com, write e-zine in the subject, and you’ll receive the e-zine every Friday. I’ll need your full name. Also make sure your spam filter is not intercepting it.

2    I’ve created a FREE DVD. It covers various topics to make your lives easier. From how to talk to your doctor to the real scoop on pain management groups to exercise, to social situation etc etc. Please go to www.drgenemartin.com to get yours. One great piece of feedback is people telling me how the chapter on “how to speak to your doctor” about fibro is especially good. In other words, how not to have the doc dismiss you in 5 minutes. I’m really happy these are helping. So far we’ve sent out over 2000. Again it is FREE and meant to be a help to those I can’t help in person.

Should I Force Myself to Exercise?

Yes and No, first, pain is a signal that something is wrong in your body. If your pain is bad and you can’t exercise, don’t. More importantly exercise is important but the key is never to push yourself.

You might have to start slowly with some stretching for perhaps 15 seconds the first day, than up to 1/2 a minute. Start with only one part of your body i.e. the arm or the leg. In time you can increase to more. If you experience a flare, you’ve done too much wait for the flare to subside and cut down the time… It must be a slow step by step program. In time you’ll be able to do more.

For those who push it and then are on your back for 2 days, than push it again and again are on your back for 2 days, you are doing more harm than good. When you push it yourself, you are ripping fibrous tissue, which is painful, but you are also allowing a lot of lactic acid to re-enter the body, hence the flare.

Go slow, step by step; if you’ve been sick for a while, it might take you months before you can start walking or doing other exercises for any period of time, but have patience, it will come. This will not cure the fibro but will keep your muscles from atrophying and keep your body healthier.
For those of you with severe Fibromyalgia or who might be bedridden, there are still very mild stretches that can be done while in your bed, stretching the arms, legs, hands etc. Again the key is to go very slow. If you experience a negative reaction, you’ve done too much, wait a day or two and then start at a slower pace.
If your pain and symptoms are so severe that exercise or stretches are out of the question, then don’t, at least until you are better stabilized. Explain to your doctor that you can’t at this time and do not let anyone force or pressure you. Remember that doctors with the best intentions cannot understand what you are experiencing unless they are living in a Fibromyalgia body. Exercise is not a treatment for fibro but a way to prevent atrophy, to keep the joints more mobile and to improve your health. You know your bodies better than anyone else; go at your own pace.

Dr. Gene Martin

Fibromyalgia Relief Center of the Bay Area

520 South El Camino Real, Ste 520

San Mateo Ca. 94402

650-558-1010

E-mail: fibro@drgenemartin.com

Web: http://www.drgenemartin.com

Skype: dr.gene.martin

You Are What You Eat Meat and Chicken

Announcements

1     For those who missed the daily tips, blogs etc, sign up for the free e-zine which will have the weeks tips and the blogs. Send an e-mail to fibro@drgenemartin.com, write e-zine in the subject, and you’ll receive the e-zine every Friday. I’ll need your full name. Also make sure your spam filter is not intercepting it.

2    I’ve created a FREE DVD. It covers various topics to make your lives easier. From how to talk to your doctor to the real scoop on pain management groups to exercise, to social situation etc etc. Please go to www.drgenemartin.com to get yours. One great piece of feedback is people telling me how the chapter on “how to speak to your doctor” about fibro is especially good. In other words, how not to have the doc dismiss you in 5 minutes. I’m really happy these are helping. So far we’ve sent out over 1700. Again it is FREE and meant to be a help to those I can’t help in person.

_____________________________________________________

You Are What You Eat Meat and Chicken

Lets start with beef and chicken, the following might surprise you and perhaps scare you!

We will begin with beef.

For decades, the meat industry has been producing and processing more meats at an ever quickening pace. This is to meet the high, and ever increasing, demand for the meat we consume each day.

In recent years, these intensive meat farm methods have come under new scrutiny and more people are becoming aware of the unacceptable conditions used to produce the beef, pork, and poultry that have become integral parts of our daily diets.

Hormones:

Most traditionally raised beef calves go from 80 pounds to 1,200 pounds in a period of about 14 months. This is no natural feat. Along with enormous quantities of grain (usually corn) and protein supplements, calves are fed or implanted with various drugs and hormones to, as the beef industry says, “promote efficient growth.”

Any combination of the natural hormones estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone, and the synthetic hormones zeranol and trenbolone acetate may be given to cattle. Another hormone, melengesterol acetate, may also be added to feed to “improve weight gain and feed efficiency.”

Measurable amounts of hormones in traditionally raised beef are transferred to humans, and some scientists believe that human consumption of estrogen from hormone-fed beef can result in cancer, premature puberty and falling sperm counts.

Antibiotics:

About nine million pounds of antibiotic feed additives are used annually in the cattle-raising process. Many people don’t realize that the largest use of antibiotics in the United States is to feed to animals, often so that they will gain more weight, but also to prevent disease outbreaks that could easily fester since the animals are raised in such crowded conditions.

This routine antibiotic use is contributing to the growing problem of antibiotic resistance in humans. Animals raised in natural environments, not the traditional “factory farms,” rarely require antibiotics. You may be able to find antibiotic-free beef in your local health food store, but be sure to be certain that it is grass-fed as well.

Along with antibiotics, traditionally raised cattle are given various vaccines and other drugs. The following is just one recommended course of care for a whole herd of cattle as shown on Pfizer.com:

  • CattleMaster 4+VL5: a 4-way viral plus 5-way leptospirosis vaccine and vibriosis protection
  • UltraChoice 8: a vaccine to prevent clostridial diseases
  • Dectomax Pour-On or Dectomax Injectable: drugs to prevent and treat internal and external parasites
  • ScourGuard 3®(K)/C: a vaccine to prevent calf scours

Irradiation:

Some commercial beef is irradiated which means it has been treated with gamma rays produced by the radioactive material, cobalt 60, or electricity to kill bacteria. The effects of long-term consumption of irradiated food products remain to be seen.

This issue is virtually the same issue as with milk. Once milk is pasteurized to “protect” us, it is seriously damaged and actually causes more harm than good for most who drink it. However, if milk is consumed in its real raw form, then it is typically an amazing health-producing food for most who consume it.

If you value your long-term health, I strongly encourage you to avoid irradiated meat. All meats will not be irradiated, so your best bet is to purchase non-irradiated meat.

Many may not be aware that school districts have the option of purchasing irradiated beef for their lunch programs, and parental notification is not required. If you are a parent you can work with your school district to discourage the use of irradiated foods, or at the very least contact them to find out whether irradiated beef is being served in your child’s school cafeteria.

You can also contact your representative and senators today to urge them not to support irradiated food in school lunches.

Environmental Problems:

Alongside the dangers that traditionally raised beef pose to your health are the dangers they pose to your environment. Substantial areas of forests, particularly the rain forests of Central America and the Amazon, are being cleared to make way for cattle. And in the United States, cattle production is a major source of environmental pollution.

Among the most severe problems are water pollution from the nearly 1 billion tons of organic waste produced by cattle each year and the enormous amounts of petro-chemical fertilizers used to produce feed crops, and air pollution–waste and waste treatment methods of grain-fed cattle are responsible for producing a significant portion of carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide (the three major gases that are largely responsible for global warming), along with other harmful gasses.

The Way Cattle are Treated:

Traditionally raised cattle are treated as commodities and are deprived of some of the most basic requirements of life–fresh air, space and normal social interaction.

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Next Commercial Chicken:

In order to control intestinal parasites, stimulate growth, improve the color of chicken meat and reduce their stress on the commercial farms, producers of commercial chickens tend to feed their chickens with additives that have adverse effects on human health. These feed additives contain the antibiotic arsenic compound known as Roxarsone, which is used to make the chickens healthier in terms of bigger breasts and pinker skin. Roxarsone is believed to cause diseases such as cancer in humans. This is according to research studies published in 2008 in “Environmental Health Perspectives,” an online journal of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and conducted by Dr. Partha Basu, an associate professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Duquesne University.

  1. Feed Additives

    • Since the 1960s, commercial chicken farmers have been using these feed additives to produce the oversized birds, and it has become a common practice throughout this commercial industry. The antibiotic found in chicken feed is used to protect the chickens from illnesses and infections, but it also induces blood vessel growth, which makes the meat appear more succulent. The problem with this is that it can produce abnormal human cell growth as well. This growth leads to the development of cancer cells, according to research done by Dr. Basu et al.

    Farming Conditions

    • The chickens are raised in crowded and unsanitary farming conditions, which leads them to contract the very illnesses and infections that chicken producers are using these harmful antibiotics to guard against. Unfortunately, these same antibiotics cause abnormal growth results in the chickens and in some cases can cause bacteria mutations and drug resistance in them as well. There is concern that there could be similar effects on humans who consume these chickens for food.

    Angiogenesis

    • The compounds found in the antibiotics used in chicken feed can cause health problems like cancer in humans, according to Dr. Basu’s research. When an increase in the formation of additional blood vessels occurs, producing their pink pigmentation, it can do the same in humans also by overproducing additional cells. This growth process is called angiogenesis and is found in many cancers and other diseases. Research done by the USDA has also found linkage between the arsenic compound found in chicken and an effect on human cells.

    Chicken Waste

    • Besides being fed these harmful additives, chickens are also used in the feed for other farm animals such as turkeys and pigs as well. Chicken waste, which is normally used for farm field fertilizers and in commercial fertilizers, may affect water supplies in the ground and on the surface. Scientists are concerned that being constantly exposed to these harmful additives found in commercial chicken feed can potentially lead to cancer for consumers as well as for the commercial chicken farmers.

    To summarize:

The antibiotics used in commercial meat and chicken farms are one of the biggest food related health threats to humans. Antibiotics are used just as commonly in farms as they are on humans, but many of the injections given in these crowded farm facilities are used to promote growth rather than prevent disease.

Growth injections have created a great deal of concern. The primary reason is because of evidence of resistant bacteria transmitted from animals to humans, including e.coli and salmonella. Because of the potential danger of these bacteria, growth injections are prohibited in Europe.

Antibiotics used for general disease control in place of sanitary living conditions can create the same resistant strains. Unfortunately, this type of injection is permitted in most intensive farms.

Other dangers include:

    • Workers in factory farms often suffer from respiratory complications and other infections due to the unclean conditions.
    • Chemical residue from commercial feed, pesticides, and antibiotics can be left in the environment, including water sources, through animal waste.
  • Commercial farming practices increase the risk of serious viral outbreaks like foot and mouth disease and bird flu.

How About Lunch Meats? (Including those Hot dogs that everybody loves)

Luncheon meats are convenience foods that may cost you your health and your life. According to the World Cancer Research Fund and the American Institute for Cancer Research, all processed meats, such as hot dogs and bologna, should be limited or even avoided in a healthy recommended diet. Luncheon meat dangers include the use of sodium nitrate or nitrite, are high in salt, high in fat and are too much meat for one’s good health.

  1. Sodium Nitrate or Nitrite

    • Sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite are preservatives used in the curing process of luncheon meats. It wards off growth of bacteria, such as botulism, and it develops the color and taste of processed meats. However there is much debate surrounding the toxicity of these preservatives. According to the World Cancer Research Fund and the American Institute for Cancer Research, there is a strong link between these preservatives and colorectal cancer. The U.S. Department of Agriculture found that low doses of sodium nitrite may cause acute methemoglobinemia, which is when the hemoglobin can no longer carry oxygen in the blood stream, especially in infants.

    Salt

    • Table salt, or sodium chloride, is often found in high quantities in luncheon meats. The USDA warns that too much salt in your diet may lead to high blood pressure and other diseases. It specifically targets processed meats, such as luncheon meats, as high in salt and sodium. Ham, for example, has roughly 1,100 milligrams of salt for about 3 1/2 ounces, while cereal has only about 300 milligrams.

    Fat

    • A diet that is low in saturated fat is recommended for healthy living. Luncheon meats are higher in saturated fat and should be limited. Lean meats and fish have less fat than processed meats such as hot dogs and luncheon meats. Unsaturated fats are good for a healthy diet, and those include avocados, nuts and olive oil. Reducing the intake of saturated fats from meats may help prevent heart disease, cancer and type two diabetes.

    Meat

    • The World Cancer Research Fund and the American Institute for Cancer Research recommend diets that limit meat, especially processed meats for overall health. Diets that are higher in plant food reduce cancer risks. Plant foodshave folates and carotenoids that help prevent cancer. For example, garlic protects against rectum and colon cancer, and fruits may prevent cancers of the esophagus, lung and stomach. Eating luncheon meat reduces your intake of vegetables and fruits that are better for your health.

It comes down to commercial meat is not healthy and not safe. You don’t have to be Einstein to see why so many people are so sick with so many illnesses, and the numbers keep rising. If you want to eat meat and chicken, free range or organic is definitely the way to go!

Dr. Gene Martin

Fibromyalgia Relief Center of the Bay Area

520 South El Camino Real, Ste 520

San Mateo Ca. 94402

650-558-1010

E-mail: fibro@drgenemartin.com

Web: http://www.drgenemartin.com

Skype: dr.gene.martin

Anger

Announcements

1     For those who missed the daily tips, blogs etc, sign up for the free e-zine which will have the weeks tips and the blogs. Send an e-mail to fibro@drgenemartin.com, write e-zine in the subject, and you’ll receive the e-zine every Friday. I’ll need your full name. Also make sure your spam filter is not intercepting it.

2    I’ve created a FREE DVD. It covers various topics to make your lives easier. From how to talk to your doctor to the real scoop on pain management groups to exercise, to social situation etc etc. Please go to www.drgenemartin.com to get yours. One great piece of feedback is people telling me how the chapter on “how to speak to your doctor” about fibro is especially good. In other words, how not to have the doc dismiss you in 5 minutes. I’m really happy these are helping. So far we’ve sent out over 1200. Again it is FREE and meant to be a help to those I can’t help in person.

_____________________________________________________

Anger

Yesterday, we received a post on my Facebook page from a woman who was obviously very angry and possibly mentally ill. She ranted on and on about how Fibromyalgia does not exist, how it is only a way for the “so called” fibro sufferers” to collect money from the government so they can sit at home all day and watch TV, courtesy of our tax dollars. I truly believe that this is an example of misguided anger.

As you can imagine, she upset quite a few people.

This got me thinking last night and though I was going to write on another topic, I, instead, chose anger. Here is the reason why and this applies not only to people with Fibromyalgia, but to all people in general.

Remember that I am speak from the perspective of the U.S.A, but I suspect that this is much more wide spread.

We live in a very skeptical and angry world. We constantly feel lied to us by our politicians, by the media and in addition, we live in a constant state of fear. Fear of cancer and other illnesses, fear of terrorist attacks, fear of all the info we receive daily about our food we eat, our air we breath and even our diet. We tend to escape, at least for a couple of hours by watching mindless television programs mostly consisting of these reality programs.

Here in the states we are watching our economy crumble, watching the level of our education and schools constantly decrease and in fact we see food lines growing bigger and bigger, something not seen since the great depression of 1929. Yet, we spend billions per day on outside wars, on supplying money to other countries (not loans, but free money) and the entire situation becomes very confusing.

The industrial crooks steal hundreds of millions from our retirement account, get caught, pay a tiny percentage back and spend a couple of years in a “country club” prison. Is it no wonder there is so much anger around us?

Yet anger is poison, it not only makes us feel anxious, but it interferes with our health, it decreases the efficiency of our immune system and makes our lives miserable.

I’m 58 years old and have been around long enough to see that no matter which president is in power, democrats or republicans, not much has changed. Our fears might be directed in other ways, for example, the cold war, but now that this is passed, it’s now terrorism. It’s no wonder there is so much anger. When I listen to politicians speak, I could swear that I’m watching “theater”. What they say changes from day to day, depending on who they are talking to.

When it comes to the global scene, I suspect there is not much we can do, however on the more local and personal level there is.

1 If possible, try to eliminate the negative, non-affirmative angry people from your lives, you don’t need that type of stimuli. Try to surround yourself with uplifting, positive people.

2 Stay away from those people who are always taking and taking, they sap your energy and contribute nothing positive to your state of mind and health. This includes those people who constantly talk about themselves and appear to really have no interest in you. They are selfish and egocentric. Be with people who are interested in what you say, who tend to look at things from a positive perspective and who are will to be optimistic and make you feel better. We all know these types.

3 Minimize your intake of watching the news, most news is sensational, not a means to report current events. The media is owned by a handful of huge conglomerates and they know that sensationalism is what sells. the days of Walter Cronkite are unfortunately gone.

4 Try to not harp on the negative, this will become easier as you wean yourselves away from the above mentioned situations and people.

One of my patients had mentioned to me that she met a man who became so angry, he went postal. I had never really heard that expression and it did not exist 20 years ago. It now means a person who gets so angry that their behavior becomes erratic and dangerous. The term “postal” is a reference to a few years back when angry people were going into post offices and shooting people for no apparent reason.

These might sound pretty self-evident, but these are decisions I have made 25 years ago. Of course I have my moments of anger, but all in all I’ve found my life to become much more enjoyable and less stressful. There might be a huge amount of angry people out there, but I guarantee that there are also caring, uplifting and plain nice people with good hearts. It might take a bit of effort to find them, but once you do, you’ll be so happy you did.

Dr. Gene Martin

Fibromyalgia Relief Center of the Bay Area

520 South El Camino Real, Ste 520

San Mateo Ca. 94402

650-558-1010

E-mail: fibro@drgenemartin.com

Web: http://www.drgenemartin.com

Skype: dr.gene.martin

My Father – A Hero

Announcement

I have created a Free DVD with Tips and The Do’s and Don’ts for People with Fibromyalgia. The idea is to help improve your quality of life. Go to my web page at http://www.drgenemartin.com for details.

My Father

My father died on Christmas evening 2010 at 11:00PM. He was 88 years old. He had suffered with congestive heart failure and knew that he had two or three years left to live, though he was getting weaker by the day, yet never complained.

For those who are familiar with CHF, you’ll know that at times the fluids back up into the lungs creating a feeling of drowning and this certainly would happen. He would cough and panic, but would ultimately get through it.

Yet during this entire ordeal, he never complained; in fact he was always more interested in my mother, my sister, myself and the grandchildren. These were his priorities.

My father was a true hero, he saw horrible action during the Second World War, yet never spoke of it. He was awarded various medals however we knew nothing of this until we were going through his belongings after his death. He never once mentioned them.

I was the last one to have a talk with my father while he was still lucent. He explained that he knew what was happening and he wasn’t scared. He told me that he loved me, the last words he ever said to me.

My father’s greatest trait was that he had a good and caring heart. To me, this is the most important trait a person can possess.

His death was gentle and painless as he was asleep for his last 2 days under the influence of Morphine, which we administered at home. He wanted to pass away at home surrounded by his family and even the family dog. This is what happened.

We all desperately miss his warmth and his generosity, he truly was the type (stereotypical as hit might sound) to give a less fortunate person, the shirt off his back. He really cared about his fellow man. Yes, he was a hero.

Fibromyalgia sufferers are also heroes, they never complain to friends and loved ones. Of course they get angry at times of how they are treated by their doctors and the public who are so ignorant of this illness. When it comes to family, friends and loved ones, people with fibromyalgia are more concerned with not burdening others with the private hell that they go through on a day to day basis.

On the outset, this might appear good, but I believe that people with Fibromyalgia need to be more vocal, perhaps not angry and not complaining, but more vocal. After all, how are the public and doctors ever going to understand what living with fibro is all about?

I’m very excited about a book that will be published in the next weeks, chronicling Fibromyalgia from the patient’s point of view. My hope is that this will help spread the word. In fact, while this book is being ready for publication, another book (a sequel) is in the works and we hope to have this out by December.

Most people I’ve met and/or treated with fibro had good hearts but were always confused as to why nobody understood their illness. Well, we are changing that, step by step.

There are many true heroes in the world; Michael J Fox comes to mind. I don’t personally know him nor does he know me; however as a leading man and successful actor he was struck down in his prime with Parkinson’s disease. Yet he never complained. He struggles from day to day and does what he can to educate the public about Parkinson’s.

There are many like Michael. I equate my father and all those suffering with fibro with Michael.

I miss my father at times I hear his voice very clearly, guiding me. He truly was a hero. So are all those suffering with Fibromyalgia.

 Dr. Gene Martin

Fibromyalgia Relief Center of the Bay Area

520 South El Camino Real, Ste 520

San Mateo Ca. 94402

Phone: 650-558-1010

E-mail: fibro@drgenemartin.com

Web: http://www.drgenemartin.com

Skype: dr.gene.martin

More Vegetarian Recipes Part 8 (Thanks to my Wife)

Important note: I’ve been working for a few months on setting up a teleconference support group for those interested. I’ve finally been able to negotiate and it’s ready to go!  The idea is to have it weekly for 45 minutes to one hour. I could speak on a topic and then there would be time for questions and answers. If any interest, please e-mail me at fibro@drgenemartin.com and write support group in the description.

Vegetarian Recipes

I’m posting recipes I receive and ones my wife uses to show that it is possible to eat a very healthy diet and still have it taste even better than the commercial foods out their that are slowing poisoning us. My wife is an excellent cook and collects recipes!

BUTTERNUT SQUASH & SAGE RISOTTO: (No Gluten)

Serves 4

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 cup leek, white part and 1 inch of green, finely chopped

1 garlic clove, minced

2 tablespoons fresh sage, chopped

1½ cups Arborio rice

2 cups butternut squash flesh, diced (¼ to ½ inch cubes)

4–5 cups low sodium vegetable broth, heated until hot

2 cups butternut squash flesh, finely diced

½ cup pine nuts

2 tablespoons salt and pepper sunflower seeds

4 tablespoons almond milk

Pinch of fresh ground nutmeg

Sea salt and fresh ground pepper to taste

1/4 cup freshly shredded Parmesan cheese* or rosemary orange pecans

Directions:

  1. In a food processor, combine the nuts, seeds, milk and nutmeg until smooth. Set aside.
  2. Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium heat and sauté the leek, garlic and sage for about 5 minutes until golden.
  3. Add the rice and squash and sauté for 2 minutes until all of the rice grains are well coated in oil.
  4. Add 1 cup of stock and simmer, stirring until absorbed. Continue to add stock, ½ cup at a time, stirring frequently for about 20-25 minutes, until the rice is creamy.
  5. When there is only a small amount of liquid left in the risotto, stir in the nut mixture, salt and pepper. Continue to simmer until all the liquid is absorbed.
  6. Cover saucepan and let rest 2 minutes.
  7. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese or nuts and serve immediately.

Broccoli-Basil Mac and Cheese

1 small butternut, acorn, or other winter squash, peeled, seeded and cut into tiny chunks

olive oil
1 bunch of basil, stems removed
2 slices good brown bread, stale or dried out in the oven
1/2 a small head of broccoli (100 g / 3.5 oz), roughly chopped
4 tablespoons creme fraiche or sour cream
~ 1 3/4 cups / 3.5 oz / 100 g grated white cheddar cheese
~ 1 3/4 cups / 3.5 oz / 100 g grated gruyere cheese
a large handful of (yellow) cherry tomatoes
3 cups / 300 g dried (whole wheat) macaroni elbows

Preheat your oven to 400F / 200C with a rack in the middle. Put a large pot of water on to boil.

Place the squash on a large baking sheet, drizzle with a bit of olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and bake for about 20-25 minutes, or until golden.

In the meantime, pulse half the basil, all of the bread, the broccoli and a lug of olive oil in a food processor until you’ve got a fine crumb. It’ll be a bit damp – that’s o.k. Transfer to a small bowl and give the processor a rinse.

In a separate bowl, combine the creme fraiche and grated cheeses.

Place the cherry tomatoes in the food processor with the remaining basil. Pulse a couple times to break things up, then add to the creme fraiche mixture and stir well.

Boil the pasta in well-salted water for a bit less time than the package suggests – you want it ever so slightly undercooked. Drain, reserving a big cup of the hot pasta water for later use. Return the hot pasta to the pan and add the cheese mixture to it. Add the squash and give it a good stir. Add pasta water to thin the sauce to the consistency of cream. It can be a bit runny as the pasta will soak it up in the oven.

Transfer everything to a large baking dish or casserole. Sprinkle the green breadcrumbs evenly across the top and bake for 20 -25 minutes or until the topping is crunchy. Remove from the oven, and wait 10 minutes before serving.

Serves 8 – 10.

Baked Quinoa Patties


2 1/2 cups / 12 oz /340 g cooked quinoa, at room temperature*
5 large eggs, lightly beaten
1/2 teaspoon fine-grain sea salt

1/3 cup/ .5 oz /15 g finely chopped fresh chives
1/3 cup /.5 oz /15 g finely chopped fresh dill
1 cup / 1.5 oz /45 g finely chopped kale
1 yellow or white onion, finely chopped
3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 teaspoon (toasted) cumin
1 teaspoons baking powder

1 cup / 3.5 oz /100 g whole grain bread crumbs, plus more if needed
water or a bit of flour, if needed

1/3 cup / .5 oz / 15 g crumbled feta

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil or clarified butter

Preheat oven to 400F / 200C.

Combine the quinoa, eggs, and salt in a medium bowl. Stir in the chives, dill, kale, onion, garlic, and cumin. Stir well.

Add the baking powder and bread crumbs, stir, and let sit for a few minutes so the crumbs can absorb some of the moisture.

Gently stir in the feta.

At this point, you should have a mixture you can easily form into twelve 1-inch / 2.5cm thick patties. I err on the very moist side because it makes for a not-overly-dry patty, but you can add more bread crumbs, a bit at a time, to firm up the mixture, if need be. Conversely, a bit more beaten egg or water can be used to moisten the mixture. If you’re still having trouble getting the mixture to hold – mix in flour, a couple tablespoons at a time.

Oil a baking sheet, and arrange the patties with a bit of space between each. Bake for ~20 minutes, or until the bottoms are brown. Flip and bake for another 5 minutes.

Enjoy hot, or allow to cool to room temperature on a cooling rack.

Makes about a dozen patties.
*To cook quinoa: Combine 2 cups/ 12 oz/340 g of well-rinsed uncooked quinoa with 3 cups / 700 ml water and 1/2 teaspoon fine-grain sea salt in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil, cover, decrease the heat, and simmer for 25 to 30 minutes, until the quinoa is tender and you can see the little quinoa curlicues.

**Alternately, you can cook the patties in a skillet. Here’s how – Heat the oil in a large, heavy skillet over medium-low heat, add 6 patties, if they’ll fit with some room between each, cover, and cook for 7 to 10 minutes, until the bottoms are deeply browned. Turn up the heat if there is no browning after 10 minutes and continue to cook until the patties are browned. Carefully flip the patties with a spatula and cook the second sides for 7 minutes, or until golden. Remove from the skillet and cool on a wire rack while you cook the remaining patties. Alternatively, the quinoa mixture keeps nicely in the refrigerator for a few days; you can cook patties to order, if you prefer.

Prep time: 10 min – Cook time: 25 min

Spiced Cauliflower with Sesame Seeds

Feel free to adjust the spiciness to your liking. And a suggestion for those of you averse to cilantro – try slivered basil instead.

1 1/2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil or clarified butter
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
2 medium yellow onions, finely sliced
a pinch of turmeric
fine grain sea salt

1 medium / 12 oz cauliflower, thinly sliced

4 dried red chiles, stemmed and halved
1-2 teaspoon sesame seeds, lightly toasted
1 garlic clove, grated

4 cm / 1 1/2-inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and finely grated

1-2 green jalapeno chiles, seeds removed, finely chopped
2-3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro / coriander

Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat, add the cumin seeds and cook until they begin to crackle, just 30 seconds or so. Stir in the onions, along with the turmeric and a few pinches of salt. Cook, stirring often, until the onions caramelize a bit and turn lightly golden, roughly 7 – 10 minutes. Add the red chiles, sesame seeds, garlic, and half of the ginger. Continue to cook for another minute. Add the cauliflower and stir well. Cover the pan and cook the cauliflower over low-medium heat for 3 – 5 minutes, until just tender.

When the cauliflower is nearly cooked, remove the lid, increase the heat, and stir in the green chiles and remaining ginger. Salt to taste, sprinkle with cilantro and enjoy.

Shredded Brussels Sprouts & Apples

Feel free to leave out the tofu if you like – I add it to make this a one skillet meal.
I used the Wildwood Organics baked savory tofu here, it browns up nicely and holds its shape – though any extra-firm tofu will work. If you don’t feel like shredding the brussels sprouts, you could do a version of this recipes cutting them into quarters instead – a bit quicker as far as prepping the ingredients goes.

1 large, crisp apple, cut into bite-sized wedges
1 lemon, juice only

4 ounces extra-firm tofu cut into tiny-inch cubes (see photo)
a couple pinches of fine-grain sea salt
a couple splashes of olive oil
2 medium cloves garlic, minced
a scant tablespoon of maple syrup
1/3 cup pine nuts, toasted and chopped

12 ounces (3/4 pound). brussels sprouts, washed and cut into 1/8-inch wide ribbons

Soak the apples in a bowl filled with water and the juice of one lemon.

Cook the tofu in large hot skillet with a bit of salt and a splash of oil. Saute until golden, about 4 minutes. Stir in the garlic, wait a few seconds, now stir in the maple syrup, and cook another 30 seconds or so. Drain the apples, and add them to the skillet, cooking for another minute. Scrape the apple and tofu mixture out onto a plate and set aside while you cook the brussels sprouts.

In the same pan (no need to wash), add a touch more oil, another pinch of salt, and dial the heat up to medium-high. When the pan is nice and hot stir in the shredded brussels sprouts. Cook for 2 – 3 minutes, stirring a couple times (but not too often) until you get some golden bits, and the rest of the sprouts are bright and delicious.
Stir the apple mixture back into the skillet alongside the brussels sprouts 1/2 of the pine nuts – gently stir to combine. Remove from heat and enjoy immediately sprinkled with the remaining pine nuts. This isn’t a dish you want sitting around, the flavors change dramatically after ten minutes or so, and I think that is part of the reason brussels sprouts get a bad rap. Even I don’t like them after they’ve been sitting around.

Serves 2 – 3 as a main, 4 as a side.

Carrot Oatmeal Cookie Recipe

After your initial batch experiment with the type of nuts/seeds you use. Lemon zest, clarified butter, and olive oil might be ingredients to play around with as well

1 cup whole wheat pastry flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
scant 1/2 teaspoon fine grain sea salt
1 cup rolled oats
2/3 cup chopped walnuts
1 cup shredded carrots
1/2 cup real maple syrup, room temperature
1/2 cup unrefined (fragrant) coconut oil, warmed until just melted
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger

Preheat oven to 375F degrees and line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

In a large bowl whisk together the flour, baking powder, salt, and oats. Add the nuts and carrots. In a separate smaller bowl use a whisk to combine the maple syrup, coconut oil, and ginger. Add this to the flour mixture and stir until just combined.

Drop onto prepared baking sheets, one level tablespoonful at a time, leaving about 2 inches between each cookie. Bake in the top 1/3 of the oven for 10 – 12 minutes or until the cookies are golden on top and bottom.

Makes about 2 1/2 dozen cookies.

Chocolate Puddle Cookies

I’ve used both 365 organic powdered sugar from Whole Foods, and Hain organic powdered sugar with success. I prefer to use non-alkalized cocoa powder (Scharrfen Berger or Dagoba) but also tested with Droste, which is a Dutch-process cocoa powder. All with success. On the nut front, be mindful of how you toast your walnuts – it’s the single factor that impacts the personality of these cookies most. Using deeply toasted walnuts makes for a much more intense, nutty cookie. Lightly toasted walnuts can sometimes be mistaken for chocolate chips, and make for a much more mild cookie. Both good! Also, cooking time – you don’t want to over or under bake here – over bake, and your cookies will cool too a crisp, under bake, and they are too floppy and crumbly. Also, underbaking makes it more difficult to remove the cookies from the parchment paper after baking – you get the swing of it after a batch or two. Use large eggs, I suspect if you use extra-large, the batter will run, and you’ll have to compensate with more powdered sugar.

3 cups / 11 oz / 310 g walnut halves, toasted & cooled
4 cups / 1 lb / 453 g confectioner’s (powdered) sugar

1/2 cup plus 3 tablespoons / 2 oz / 60 g unsweetened cocoa powder

scant 1/2 teaspoon fine grain sea salt
4 large egg whites, room temperature
1 tablespoon real, good-quality vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 320F / 160C degrees and position racks in the top and bottom third. Line three (preferably rimmed) baking sheets with parchment paper. Or you can bake in batches with fewer pans.

Make sure your walnuts have cooled a bit, then chop coarsely and set aside. Sift together the confectioner’s sugar, cocoa powder, and sea salt. Stir in the walnuts, then add the egg whites and vanilla. Stir until well combined.

Spoon the batter onto the prepared sheets in mounds of about 2 tablespoons each, allowing for PLENTY of room between cookies. These cookies are like reverse Shrinky Dinks – they really expand. Don’t try to get more than 6 cookies on each sheet, and try to avoid placing the batter too close to the edge of the pan.

Bake until they puff up. The tops should get glossy, and then crack a bit – about 12 -15 minutes. Have faith, they look sad at first, then really blossom. You may want to rotate the pans top/bottom/back/front.

Slide the cookies still on parchment onto a cooling rack, and let them cool completely. They will keep in an airtight for a couple days.

Makes 18 large cookies.

Prep time: 20 min – Cook time: 15 min